Jeffrey MacDonald revives push to prove his innocence : News Photo

Jeffrey MacDonald revives push to prove his innocence

Bob Stevenson speaks with the media after the first day of the hearing for Jeffrey MacDonald, who has been in prison for almost four decades for killing his sister Collete MacDonald, he said, 'The truth is, there is nothing new out there, there is nothing. Do you know how much DNA is in my home and your home? The mere discovery of DNA has nothing to do with a man's guilt.' 'Until he is dead or I am dead, we will be battling as adversaries,' he said, 'I will never lose interest. I will never lose zeal. I will never lose faith.' as he leaves the Federal Courthouse in Wilmington, North Carolina, Monday, September 17, 2012. MacDonald, a former Fort Bragg Army officers and doctor, was convicted in 1979 of murdering his wife and two young daughters in 1970. The hearing could determine whether MacDonald could receive a new trial, decades after he was convicted of killing his family. (Chuck Liddy/Raleigh News & Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
Caption:
Bob Stevenson speaks with the media after the first day of the hearing for Jeffrey MacDonald, who has been in prison for almost four decades for killing his sister Collete MacDonald, he said, 'The truth is, there is nothing new out there, there is nothing. Do you know how much DNA is in my home and your home? The mere discovery of DNA has nothing to do with a man's guilt.' 'Until he is dead or I am dead, we will be battling as adversaries,' he said, 'I will never lose interest. I will never lose zeal. I will never lose faith.' as he leaves the Federal Courthouse in Wilmington, North Carolina, Monday, September 17, 2012. MacDonald, a former Fort Bragg Army officers and doctor, was convicted in 1979 of murdering his wife and two young daughters in 1970. The hearing could determine whether MacDonald could receive a new trial, decades after he was convicted of killing his family. (Chuck Liddy/Raleigh News & Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
Calculate priceView cart
Date created:
September 17, 2012
Editorial #:
152247987
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses.
License type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Photographer:
Raleigh News & Observer / Contributor
Collection:
McClatchy-Tribune
Credit:
MCT via Getty Images
Max file size:
3,000 x 1,903 px (10.00 x 6.34 in) - 300 dpi - 3.24 MB
Release info:
Not released.More information
Source:
McClatchy-Tribune
Object name:
895150900

Keywords

This image is subject to copyright. Getty Images reserves the right to pursue unauthorized users of this image or clip, and to seek damages for copyright violations. To learn more about copyright and Getty Images’ enforcement program, click here. Availability for this image cannot be guaranteed until time of purchase.
Bob Stevenson speaks with the media after the first day of the... News Photo 152247987Court Hearing,Day,Females,Horizontal,Killing,Law,Leaves,North Carolina,Prison,Sister,Talking,The Media,USA,Wilmington - North CarolinaPhotographer Collection: McClatchy-Tribune 2012 MCTBob Stevenson speaks with the media after the first day of the hearing for Jeffrey MacDonald, who has been in prison for almost four decades for killing his sister Collete MacDonald, he said, 'The truth is, there is nothing new out there, there is nothing. Do you know how much DNA is in my home and your home? The mere discovery of DNA has nothing to do with a man's guilt.' 'Until he is dead or I am dead, we will be battling as adversaries,' he said, 'I will never lose interest. I will never lose zeal. I will never lose faith.' as he leaves the Federal Courthouse in Wilmington, North Carolina, Monday, September 17, 2012. MacDonald, a former Fort Bragg Army officers and doctor, was convicted in 1979 of murdering his wife and two young daughters in 1970. The hearing could determine whether MacDonald could receive a new trial, decades after he was convicted of killing his family. (Chuck Liddy/Raleigh News & Observer/MCT via Getty Images)