Kabul, Afghanistan: Before And After The Taliban : News Photo

Kabul, Afghanistan: Before And After The Taliban

Credit: 
Robert Nickelsberg / Contributor
398226 07: At a local photocopying shop run by a studio photographer, pictures of Taliban soldiers taken on their demand against a scenic backdrop are shown November 27, 2001 after the Taliban left Kabul, Afghanistan. The Taliban had prohibited full length photography of humans and only permitted ID photos necessary for passports or security ID passes. The shop owner said many Arabs would have their ID pictures taken in his shop and some would insist to be present in the darkroom to make sure no extra copies of their face would be made. The shopowner made more money photocopying documents for the Kabul University faculty departments than taking studio pictures. He continues to make large amounts of photocopies but of documents from houses where Arab, Chechen and Uzbek militants lived and rapidly fled leaving the piles of papers to journalists to sift through. (Photo by Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images)
Caption:
398226 07: At a local photocopying shop run by a studio photographer, pictures of Taliban soldiers taken on their demand against a scenic backdrop are shown November 27, 2001 after the Taliban left Kabul, Afghanistan. The Taliban had prohibited full length photography of humans and only permitted ID photos necessary for passports or security ID passes. The shop owner said many Arabs would have their ID pictures taken in his shop and some would insist to be present in the darkroom to make sure no extra copies of their face would be made. The shopowner made more money photocopying documents for the Kabul University faculty departments than taking studio pictures. He continues to make large amounts of photocopies but of documents from houses where Arab, Chechen and Uzbek militants lived and rapidly fled leaving the piles of papers to journalists to sift through. (Photo by Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images)
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Date created:
November 27, 2001
Editorial #:
676003
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Not released.More information
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39822607kabu_20011205_00437.jpg

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At a local photocopying shop run by a studio photographer pictures of... News Photo 676003Afghanistan,Army Soldier,Community,Demanding,Freedom,Image,Kabul,Left,Lifestyles,Militant Groups,Photocopier,Photographer,Photography,Politics,Run,Scenics,Store,Studio,Taliban,United Islamic Front for the Salvation of Afghanistan,War,War in Afghanistan: 2001-presentPhotographer Collection: Getty Images News 398226 07: At a local photocopying shop run by a studio photographer, pictures of Taliban soldiers taken on their demand against a scenic backdrop are shown November 27, 2001 after the Taliban left Kabul, Afghanistan. The Taliban had prohibited full length photography of humans and only permitted ID photos necessary for passports or security ID passes. The shop owner said many Arabs would have their ID pictures taken in his shop and some would insist to be present in the darkroom to make sure no extra copies of their face would be made. The shopowner made more money photocopying documents for the Kabul University faculty departments than taking studio pictures. He continues to make large amounts of photocopies but of documents from houses where Arab, Chechen and Uzbek militants lived and rapidly fled leaving the piles of papers to journalists to sift through. (Photo by Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images)