WWI-100TH-ANNIVERSARY-VILLERS PLOUICH : News Photo

WWI-100TH-ANNIVERSARY-VILLERS PLOUICH

An unidentified British army soldiers pay their respect on August 21, 2013 after the burial of an unknown soldier at the Fifteen Ravine British Cemetery in Villers-Plouich, northern France. 'Fifteen Ravine' was the name given by the Army to the shallow ravine, once bordered by fifteen trees, which ran at right angles to the railway about 800 metres south of the village of Villers-Plouich. The cemetery, sometimes called Farm Ravine Cemetery, was begun by the 17th Welsh Regiment in April 1917, a few days after the capture of the ravine by the 12th South Wales Borderers. It continued in use during the Battle of Cambrai (November 1917) and until March 1918, when the ravine formed the boundary between the Third and Fifth Armies. On 22 March, the second day of the great German offensive, the ground passed into their hands after severe fighting, and it was not regained until the end of the following September. In March 1918, the cemetery contained 107 graves (now Plot I), but it was greatly enlarged after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the battlefields south-west of Cambrai and other cemeteries. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE HUGUEN (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images)
Caption:
An unidentified British army soldiers pay their respect on August 21, 2013 after the burial of an unknown soldier at the Fifteen Ravine British Cemetery in Villers-Plouich, northern France. 'Fifteen Ravine' was the name given by the Army to the shallow ravine, once bordered by fifteen trees, which ran at right angles to the railway about 800 metres south of the village of Villers-Plouich. The cemetery, sometimes called Farm Ravine Cemetery, was begun by the 17th Welsh Regiment in April 1917, a few days after the capture of the ravine by the 12th South Wales Borderers. It continued in use during the Battle of Cambrai (November 1917) and until March 1918, when the ravine formed the boundary between the Third and Fifth Armies. On 22 March, the second day of the great German offensive, the ground passed into their hands after severe fighting, and it was not regained until the end of the following September. In March 1918, the cemetery contained 107 graves (now Plot I), but it was greatly enlarged after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the battlefields south-west of Cambrai and other cemeteries. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE HUGUEN (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images)
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Date created:
August 21, 2013
Editorial #:
177128750
Restrictions:
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Photographer:
PHILIPPE HUGUEN / Staff
Collection:
AFP
Credit:
AFP/Getty Images
Max file size:
3,856 x 2,587 px (53.56 x 35.93 in) - 72 dpi - 9.65 MB
Release info:
Not released.More information
Source:
AFP
Barcode:
AFP
Object name:
Par7638579

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An unidentified British army soldiers pay their respect on August 21... News Photo 177128750800 Meter,Angle,Army,Army Soldier,British,British Military,Cemetery,France,Given,Horizontal,Identity,Nord,Place of Burial,Rail Transportation,Railroad Track,Respect,Right,Shallow,Social Issues,Tree,VillagePhotographer Collection: AFP 2013 AFPAn unidentified British army soldiers pay their respect on August 21, 2013 after the burial of an unknown soldier at the Fifteen Ravine British Cemetery in Villers-Plouich, northern France. 'Fifteen Ravine' was the name given by the Army to the shallow ravine, once bordered by fifteen trees, which ran at right angles to the railway about 800 metres south of the village of Villers-Plouich. The cemetery, sometimes called Farm Ravine Cemetery, was begun by the 17th Welsh Regiment in April 1917, a few days after the capture of the ravine by the 12th South Wales Borderers. It continued in use during the Battle of Cambrai (November 1917) and until March 1918, when the ravine formed the boundary between the Third and Fifth Armies. On 22 March, the second day of the great German offensive, the ground passed into their hands after severe fighting, and it was not regained until the end of the following September. In March 1918, the cemetery contained 107 graves (now Plot I), but it was greatly enlarged after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the battlefields south-west of Cambrai and other cemeteries. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE HUGUEN (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images)