Eagle Show At Conowingo Dam : News Photo

Eagle Show At Conowingo Dam

Credit: 
The Washington Post / Contributor
HARFORD COUNTY, MD - NOVEMBER 29: Adult and juvenal American bald eagles rest along the rocky shores of Conowingo Dam in Harford County, Maryland on November 29, 2012. On most days between Thanksgiving and into January, the shallow waters becomes a prime spot to watch 20-50 eagles hunt for fish along the Susquehanna river. Fish that are sucked through the dam turbines are easy pickings on the other side for eagles as well as buzzards, crows and seagulls. Once the first cold snaps hit in the north, the eagles migrate south for a few months. Wildlife photographers and bird enthusiasts far outnumber fishermen a the dam these days as they try to capture perfect shots of eagles hunting, mid-air fights and dining on fish. Binoculars or high powered lenses are recommended if you want to see the birds up close. Photo shot with a Nikon 600mm f4 lens with a 1.4 teleconverter. (Photo by Linda Davidson / The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Caption:
HARFORD COUNTY, MD - NOVEMBER 29: Adult and juvenal American bald eagles rest along the rocky shores of Conowingo Dam in Harford County, Maryland on November 29, 2012. On most days between Thanksgiving and into January, the shallow waters becomes a prime spot to watch 20-50 eagles hunt for fish along the Susquehanna river. Fish that are sucked through the dam turbines are easy pickings on the other side for eagles as well as buzzards, crows and seagulls. Once the first cold snaps hit in the north, the eagles migrate south for a few months. Wildlife photographers and bird enthusiasts far outnumber fishermen a the dam these days as they try to capture perfect shots of eagles hunting, mid-air fights and dining on fish. Binoculars or high powered lenses are recommended if you want to see the birds up close. Photo shot with a Nikon 600mm f4 lens with a 1.4 teleconverter. (Photo by Linda Davidson / The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Calculate priceView cart
Date created:
November 29, 2012
Editorial #:
157257779
Restrictions:
Contact your local office for all commercial or promotional uses.The use of Washington Post images for political advertising or endorsements is not permitted.
License type:
Rights-managedRights-managed products are licensed with restrictions on usage, such as limitations on size, placement, duration of use and geographic distribution. You will be asked to submit information concerning your intended use of the product, which will determine the scope of usage rights granted.
Collection:
The Washington Post
Max file size:
3,600 x 2,217 px (18.00 x 11.09 in) - 200 dpi - 3.25 MB
Release info:
Not released.More information
Source:
The Washington Post
Object name:
PH-Eagles

Keywords

This image is subject to copyright. Getty Images reserves the right to pursue unauthorized users of this image or clip, and to seek damages for copyright violations. To learn more about copyright and Getty Images’ enforcement program, click here. Availability for this image cannot be guaranteed until time of purchase.
Adult and juvenal American bald eagles rest along the rocky shores of... News Photo 157257779Adult,American,Eagles,Hair Loss,Horizontal,Human Interest,Maryland,Resting,Rock,Shore,USAPhotographer Collection: The Washington Post 2012 The Washington PostHARFORD COUNTY, MD - NOVEMBER 29: Adult and juvenal American bald eagles rest along the rocky shores of Conowingo Dam in Harford County, Maryland on November 29, 2012. On most days between Thanksgiving and into January, the shallow waters becomes a prime spot to watch 20-50 eagles hunt for fish along the Susquehanna river. Fish that are sucked through the dam turbines are easy pickings on the other side for eagles as well as buzzards, crows and seagulls. Once the first cold snaps hit in the north, the eagles migrate south for a few months. Wildlife photographers and bird enthusiasts far outnumber fishermen a the dam these days as they try to capture perfect shots of eagles hunting, mid-air fights and dining on fish. Binoculars or high powered lenses are recommended if you want to see the birds up close. Photo shot with a Nikon 600mm f4 lens with a 1.4 teleconverter. (Photo by Linda Davidson / The Washington Post via Getty Images)