Abraham Bojorquez, leader of the rap gro : News Photo

Abraham Bojorquez, leader of the rap gro

Credit: 
AFP / Stringer
Abraham Bojorquez, leader of the rap group Ukamaku y Ke ('That's it, so what?' in Aymara language), is blessed by a witch doctor on a traditional ritual at El Alto, an impoverished satellite city overlooking La Paz, on January 24, 2009. Despite widespread harsh feelings towards US policies, Bolivian youths embrace US Hip-Hop culture as a way to vent their anger over historical oppression and exploitation. Through songs that praise President Evo Morales' 'democratic revolution' and a claim for social changes, Bolivian rappers believe there is no contradiction between their 'gringo' look and the anti-imperialist slant. Largely descendants of Aymara indigenous migrants from the high plains to the cities of El Alto and La Paz, those youngsters see in the thriving hip-hop scene a chance to voice their plight and channel their young rebellious spirit. AFP PHOTO/Joao Padua MORE IN IMAGE FORUM (Photo credit should read JOAO PADUA/AFP/Getty Images)
Caption:
Abraham Bojorquez, leader of the rap group Ukamaku y Ke ('That's it, so what?' in Aymara language), is blessed by a witch doctor on a traditional ritual at El Alto, an impoverished satellite city overlooking La Paz, on January 24, 2009. Despite widespread harsh feelings towards US policies, Bolivian youths embrace US Hip-Hop culture as a way to vent their anger over historical oppression and exploitation. Through songs that praise President Evo Morales' 'democratic revolution' and a claim for social changes, Bolivian rappers believe there is no contradiction between their 'gringo' look and the anti-imperialist slant. Largely descendants of Aymara indigenous migrants from the high plains to the cities of El Alto and La Paz, those youngsters see in the thriving hip-hop scene a chance to voice their plight and channel their young rebellious spirit. AFP PHOTO/Joao Padua MORE IN IMAGE FORUM (Photo credit should read JOAO PADUA/AFP/Getty Images)
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Date created:
January 25, 2009
Editorial #:
84601326
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AFP
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Source:
AFP
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AFP
Object name:
Mvd850915

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Abraham Bojorquez leader of the rap group Ukamaku y Ke is blessed by... News Photo 84601326Bolivia,City,Cultures,Doctor,El Alto,Group,Horizontal,La Paz - Bolivia,Leader,Looking Over,Poverty,Rap,Satellite,Social Issues,Traditional Ceremony,WitchPhotographer Collection: AFP 2009 AFPAbraham Bojorquez, leader of the rap group Ukamaku y Ke ('That's it, so what?' in Aymara language), is blessed by a witch doctor on a traditional ritual at El Alto, an impoverished satellite city overlooking La Paz, on January 24, 2009. Despite widespread harsh feelings towards US policies, Bolivian youths embrace US Hip-Hop culture as a way to vent their anger over historical oppression and exploitation. Through songs that praise President Evo Morales' 'democratic revolution' and a claim for social changes, Bolivian rappers believe there is no contradiction between their 'gringo' look and the anti-imperialist slant. Largely descendants of Aymara indigenous migrants from the high plains to the cities of El Alto and La Paz, those youngsters see in the thriving hip-hop scene a chance to voice their plight and channel their young rebellious spirit. AFP PHOTO/Joao Padua MORE IN IMAGE FORUM (Photo credit should read JOAO PADUA/AFP/Getty Images)