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Pride: Out of the Closet, Into the Streets

By Celeste Lavin


Pride! All around the world, communities gather to celebrate LGBTQ identity. When who you are has been criminalized, criticized and ostracized, marching through the streets and proclaiming pride in that identity is a big deal. Although Pride parades now include millions of people worldwide, have become a mandatory stop for progressive politicians and receive sponsorship from mainstream companies, the celebrations started as something that looks little like the rainbow parades we have today. It began with a riot. 

In New York City, in the early morning of June 28, 1969, the NYPD raided The Stonewall Inn, a gay bar. Anti-gay laws made these raids routine, a part of life for LGBTQ bar-goers. For decades, these communities faced harassment by the police in one of the few gathering spaces available to queer and trans people. On that June night, the patrons of Stonewall had had enough, and they fought back. Marsha P. Johsnon and Sylvia Rivera, two transwomen helped lead the charge. Chanting and yelling, throwing things and refusing to budge, the crowd resisted the raid. Thirteen people were arrested, but no amount of jail time would silence the resistance of that night.

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A year later, galvanized into action, the community in New York City held the first Stonewall anniversary march, known then as Christopher Street Gay Liberation Day. Honoring that night of resistance, LGBTQ people marched through the streets, signs held high. Decades later, the tradition continues in New York City, and around the world, too. There is so much to love about Pride. 

THE HISTORY

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The love

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THE CELEBRATION OF IDENTITY

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THE STRONG LOOKS

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THE "DyKes on Bikes" CONTINGENT

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THE COLORS

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THE Gay Religious Groups

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LGBTQ Groups of all kinds! 

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all those proud parents

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AND PROUD PUPS, TOO

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